Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Purple pikelets with nut pulp

The first time I made nut milk at home, I didn't know what to do with the pulp left at the end. To be honest, it scared me a little. It is an odd looking substance. Sort of curd-like, and moist but crumbly. Edible? I didn't think so.

Hmm. No, thank you.

And yet...quite a lot of you told me to add it to baked goods. And so when I made cashew milk recently, I retained the nut pulp and put it in the fridge and thought about what I could do with it.

The answer was a purple version of the small, fluffy pancakes that are Australian pikelets.


I don't know if it was the nut pulp or just a good pikelet-making day, but these pikelets were really, really good. Fluffy. Light. Soft. In all, so highly enjoyable that I'm considering making nut milk again just so I can replicate the experience.

If you aren't into nut milk making, you don't have to go through that step in order to try these yourself. If you're lacking in the nut pulp department (that doesn't read very well, does it?), just use almond meal or hazelnut meal instead. If you don't have those to hand, extra flour would get you by too.


You could also make these with diced apple, and omit the sultanas if they aren't your thing. There are lots of options. I served them with fig jam, but they are also delicious plain, or you could add some nut butter. Or fig jam and nut butter, which I'm now wishing I had thought of when I still had some pikelets left...

Purple pikelets with nut pulp
Vegan
Makes 1 batch of pikelets, about 16


Ingredients
2 small purple carrots, grated (~3/4 cup grated)
1 cup self-raising flour
1/4 cup nut pulp as leftover from homemade nut milk, OR 1/4 cup minus 1 tbsp hazelnut meal, almond meal or extra plain flour
1 cup non-dairy milk, OR 1 cup + 1 tbsp non-dairy milk if using hazelnut/almond meal or extra flour
1 tsp chia seeds
1/2 cup sultanas (small raisins)
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 - 1 tsp cinnamon


Method
Combine all ingredients and stir to combine. Allow to stand for 15 - 20 minutes, preferably in the fridge.

Heat a non-stick pan and drop spoonfuls of mixture on to the pan. Cook until bubbles start to appear on the surface, about 2 minutes, and then flip and cook for a similar time on the other side. Repeat for the remaining batter.

Serve warm. 


I think I am definitely over my fear of nut pulp.

Submitted to Healthy Vegan Fridays #35.

If you make nut or seed milk, do you have a favourite use for the pulp at the end?
Or do you just have a favourite use for purple carrots?

31 comments:

  1. Hey Kari! Those look so good and fluffy! :)

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  2. These pikelets do look delicious, with plenty of body - but you are right about the nut pulp!

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    Replies
    1. It's quite an amazing ingredient!

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  3. I've never made my own bit milk but your recipe has me intrigued to try it

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    1. It's really fun Jan - I don't do it every week but I like it on occasion.

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  4. Nut pulp is awesome - these look fabulous too - and such a pretty colour! I can only seem to find purple carrots on the rare occasion, which is sad as I think they are SO beautiful. I have a great recipe for a "freezer-fudge" that is a common way to use up pulp in my house.

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    1. Purple carrots used to be quite rare here too, but they're quite accessible now. I think they're grown over east though, rather than locally - more of a cool weather vegetable so probably not common within Qld either!

      Freezer fudge may be my next nut pulp experiment - yum!

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  5. I have no idea what a pikelet it is, but your creation with the nut pulp looks good. :-)

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    1. Think small pancakes crossed with hotcakes :-)

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  6. Very neat recipe, never tried something like this before but now I want to!!

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    1. They come highly recommended if you do decide to try them out :)

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  7. What a great use for the nut pulp, your pikelets look so good! When I made tofu last year I had okara (soy bean pulp) leftover which I shoved into the freezer until I could figure out what to do with it. I eventually used it in some burgers but it wasn't the greatest recipe... I wonder if okara would work in pikelets too?

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    1. That's a great idea - I haven't used okara so can't speak definitively, but I'd say there's a good likelihood.

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    2. I make "soysage" with okara ... so delicious! Can make "granola" with it as well. I am from the US but living for now in Perth, W. Australia and I am looking to find a place I can get/buy okara here. Back home in California, I used to go to a small, fantastic tofu shop, and they would just give the okara to me ... as their main business was in tofu and soy milk.

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  8. Those look fantastic! I've used nut pulp in pancakes before and you're right- it adds such great fluffiness :)

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  9. Oh these look fantastic, I love picklets but I have never made them like this before... delicious :)

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    1. I really, really enjoyed them :)

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  10. You said fig jam, and now I'm dreaming of fresh figs and Maggie Beer's burnt fig jam and IT'S STILL SNOWING OUTSIDE GOD MAKE IT STOP I WANT FIGS AND PIKELETS the end.

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    1. Oh dear, that was quite the unintended effect! On the plus side, if you go with fig jam rather than fresh figs, these can be all yours and eaten in front of heat with a blanket and something to block out all views of snow!

      Snow in Spring (ish) does seem very mean, even for Canada...

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  11. Hi Kari,
    I'm about to give making my own nut milk a go - I think the pulp would go well in pikelets and pancakes. The leftover fibre would be so good for you I imagine.
    xx

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    1. That's a good point - I'm sure it is! I hope you enjoy experimenting Liz; let us know how you get on.

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  12. they look excellent - I actually think that I would love to make nut milk just so that I have the pulp to play with - someone once suggested nut roasts with carrot pulp from a juicer - I suspect that your nut pulp would go well in a nut roast - and in lots of baking too. Actually I am not sure I have ever made pancakes with nuts but this sounds an excellent idea

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    1. Ooh, carrot pulp? That has me intrigued too. I'm sure nut pulp would go well in nut roast actually, and perhaps in far more things than I've even been able to imagine. Pikelets might be a stepping stone for much more!

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  13. I guess it makes sense that you can eat the pulp because you normally eat the whole nut anyway! Wow it really did make these super fluffy!

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  14. I have to say that this is one delicious and inventive way to use up the pulp! YUM!

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  15. What an awesome idea for nut pulp! :-) Very clever of you.

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    1. Thanks Sandy - it's certainly an easy way to use it up!

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